Writing From the Trenches: My Writing Journey… So Far

I recently guest posted on Scientist Sees Squirrel, a great ecology blog run by Dr. Stephen B. Heard.  So far it was has been a two part roller-coaster-type of affair (as far as science writing can be a roller-coaster-type of affair). Below are the links for both posts on Scientist sees squirrel followed by a snippet of both posts.  Check them out and check out Stephen’s blog, it’s great!

Part 1

“This is a guest post by Joe Drake, a PhD student in the Department of Environmental Conservation at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.  Joe’s own blog is The Secret Life of a Field Biologist, and you can email him at jdrake@umass.edu.

Part I:  In Which Our Hero Enters the Wilderness

Do you know what was one of the most stupid things I ever said I could do? Start and then finish an NSF proposal over the course of a winter break.  My advisor and I sat down the day before leaving and hammered out a wonderful conceptual model for our project and eventual proposal.  We created Google docs to work from.  We were excited. We had a great idea. I said that I’d have a draft in two weeks.  I was an idiot.

This isn’t the story of long-ago writing lessons.  This isn’t the story of how I learned to write.  This is the story of a couple of weeks ago and today.  This is the story of how I’m learning to write.  It’s a story full of failures.  Some have already happened; many are yet to happen.  Many readers may have already learned from their own versions of these, or maybe like me, they have just begun to encounter such challenges.  Maybe my mistakes can help you along your writer’s journey*.”

Continue here: http://wp.me/p5x2kS-Dc


Part 2

(Continued) From the trenches: How I’m learning to write (guest post)

Image:The PhD monomyth.  Compare with the monomyth narrative structure, the Hero’s Journey (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hero’s_journey).   Adaptation by J. Drake.

This is Part II of a guest post by Joe Drake, a PhD student in the Department of Environmental Conservation at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.  Part I is here.  Joe’s own blog is The Secret Life of a Field Biologist, and you can email him at jdrake@umass.edu.

 

Part II:  In which our hero returns…. “enlightened”?

Our story up to now: I am a student learning how to write (and to do science, which involves a batch of writing).  I haven’t been very good at it, and I’m still not that great, but through valiantly misguided (misguidedly valiant?) efforts, I’m here telling you how I’ve started to get better.  Perhaps this will help you too (for more details see part 1).

As a new grad student, I had just traded the world I had learned to know (as field biologist) for a brand new unknown.  I landed myself in the middle of nowhere: Lubbock, Texas.  Far from the areas I had done research.  Far from anything but dust storms, cotton fields, and BBQ (hey, it wasn’t all bad).

I had a very constructive and supportive environment in the Dr. Griffis-Kyle Lab, and thus a soft landing into this unknown.  My lab held writing group meetings and helped me develop good writing habitats alongside people willing to support them. They offered a helpful critique to enhance a well-executed bit or a hand when I fell flat on my face in failure.

My blog continued in bursts and fits and spurts. I tried (and still try, for that matter) to post regularly. I got into science outreach and communication and that lead me to try writing for even wider audiences.  Then I got to participate in different types of seminars that pushed my comfort zones and let me explore the literary side of ecological writing.  I got to present at the Sowell Conference and meet Barry Lopez and other great writers.  I started delving into authors like David Quammen, Rick Bass, Peter Matthiessen, John McPhee, Stephen Jay Gould, and Charles Bowden.  I was inspired and educated more deeply than I could have thought.”

Finish reading here: http://wp.me/p5x2kS-Dx

Thanks everyone and enjoy!

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